Hampana’s “Charu Vasanta” released in Marathi

Pune (Maharashtra), June 25, 2014: The Marathi edition of “Charu Vasantha”, a Jain Mahakaavya (Classic) by Hampa Nagarajaiah, the doyen of Kannada literature and Jainism was released in Pune on June 25, 2014. It was released by the renowned Marathi poet and author Vasant Abaji Dahake in the presence of Chandrakant Kusnoor a well known Kannada author and artist and Hampana. Renowned Marathi writer Prabha Ganorkar presided over the function.

Charu Vasanta the great classic emanated in the early part of this century is unique in its exposition in the history of Kannada literature. It depicts the contrasts and conflicts prevailing at all times and is further illustrated picturesquely in comparison with the cyclical and radical changes observed in the modern era. The theme of this classic whirls around the romanticism between Charudatta belonging to Jain mechant class and Vasanta Tilake, the harlot with astounding beauty. He was jolted with his affluent property to her and lost the glory of his profession. However, he made up his mind towards an adventurous task of regaining what ever he had lost. Vasanta Tilake marries him  impressed by his handsomeness and his ability to regain the wealth. This implies her willful and hearty acceptance of the situation.

This transgression between them in terms of caste and creed played no role despite the period. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that the parents of Charudatta also endorsed their marriage mainly due to their inclination towards him. Mitravati, the wife of Charudatta also endorsed their marriage. In addition to this pragmatic event, Charudatta faced many hurdles during his voyage and his return to Champapura. The story is folk type  and character’s appear befitting to it. This classic  also emphasis the relation of earth with heaven.

Hampana has knitted this present intricate but narrative theme in its desi style. Here one can find an amalgamation of Ragale, Champu, Shatpadi and alienated styles of prosody in Kannada. A few of the words which have become oblivion have been revived in this classic, denoting Hampana’s linguistic erudition.

It can be recalled here that the Hindi trasnlation of this work was released in 2012. It is interesting to note that this great classic is also been translated to other languages such as Telugu, Oriya, Rajasthani and Banjara.

This work has evolved and presented with the intention of celebrating 46 years of married life and also in remembrance of 68th birth anniversary of Dr.Kamala Hampana. – Jain Heritage Centres News Service

Post Author: JHC